Spotlight on Library Legislation - What is the Library Services and Technology Act?
Nov 18, 2013
  • The Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) is the only federal program exclusively for libraries.
  • LSTA was reauthorized under the Museum and Library Services Act (MLSA) of 2010 (S. 3984) and signed by the president on December 22, 2010.
  • LSTA will be up for reauthorization again in 2015.
  • LSTA is administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.
  • State libraries use the funds to support statewide initiatives and also distribute the funds through subgrants or cooperative agreements to public, school, academic, research and special libraries.
  • LSTA consolidates federal library programs, while expanding services for learning and access to information resources in all types of libraries for individuals of all ages.
  • LSTA funding provides libraries with the resources needed to offer a range of programming including resume writing, family literacy events, learning how to access government information, and much more.
  • Every fiscal year, Congress provides funding for LSTA in the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill.
  • The LSTA for 2014 will be funded at a level of $175,000,000.
  • For more detailed information about the LSTA, visit http://www.ala.org/advocacy/advleg/federallegislation/lsta
Oppose Delay to Public Access of Federally Funded Research
Nov 15, 2013

A message from Kara Malenfant, ACRL's Senior Strategist for Special Initiatives:

 

Currently circulating in U.S. Congress is the Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science and Technology Act of 2013 (FIRST) Act. One provision of the bill – Section 302 – would undercut federal agencies’ ability to effectively implement the widely-supported White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Directive on Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research, undermine the public access program pioneered by the National Institutes of Health, and put the U.S. at a severe disadvantage among our global competitors.

 

Earlier this week, ACRL joined with 10 other national and regional library, publishing, and advocacy organizations to express our strong opposition to this language in a letter to Congress (see http://sparc.arl.org/sites/default/files/OAWG%20FIRST%20Letter_0.pdf). ACRL’s legislative agenda includes increased access to federally funded research as one of our top issues.

 

We encourage you to let your members of Congress know that you oppose language in the proposed FIRST Act to delay public access. Learn more, read talking points and take action at http://www.sparc.arl.org/advocacy/national/first.

 

2013 ACRL Legislative Agenda
Sep 26, 2013

The 2013 ACRL Legislative Agenda focuses on three issues that the U.S. Congress has recently taken, or will most likely take action on in the year ahead:

  • First sale doctrine
  • Public access to federally funded research
  • Federal funding for libraries

New this year, the agenda includes a watch list of policy issues of great concern to academic librarians. Legislation on these issues is not likely to arise and, moreover, ACRL does not believe that any legislation about these issues is necessary.

Issues on the watch list are:

  • Government information
  • Safe harbor provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act
  • Orphan works/section 108
  • Fair use

ACRL will continue tracking these issues and advocate for the best interests of academic and research libraries, if necessary. Read the complete legislative agenda for more details.

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