ALA ACRL

Out of Office (For the Semester)

This semester I’m on sabbatical from the library. At my university librarians are faculty and eligible for research leaves, and I’m grateful to have been granted one for the spring and early summer. I’m using the time to work on a few writing projects with collaborators and I’ve also started a new research project. I’ll … Continue reading Out of Office (For the Semester) →

Indies, Vanity, and Predators: Helping Faculty and Students Find Publishers

How many times have you or your faculty received this message? Dear Dr. Colleague, We at Intellectual and Smart Publishers would love to talk to you about publishing “INSERT PAPER TITLE HERE” in our issue of Smart Things in Science. We offer expedited review! So and So,  Intellectual and Smart Publishers When the Framework for … Continue reading Indies, Vanity, and Predators: Helping Faculty and Students Find Publishers →

Things Left Unsaid

There are moments of confluence in our day-to-day lives that can impact the way we see ourselves in the world. Sometimes they are moments of revelation and other times they are just a slight shift in perception, a tweak in the way we experience life. This month, which just so happens to be Women’s History Month, … Continue reading Things Left Unsaid →

On Leadership: Doing it Right, but Dancing

Lots of things leading up to a post on leadership lately, such as contemplating my own privilege, planning strategic priorities, and experiencing the challenges of parenting tweenagers. But mostly, I think this post is in typical response to evaluation time, which requires me to describe competencies and expectations of leadership, both for managers and  for … Continue reading On Leadership: Doing it Right, but Dancing →

Your Library Is a (Job-Seeker’s) Wonderland

ACRLog welcomes a guest post from Megan Mall, Director of Content Strategy at the American Association of Law Libraries. In my previous position, I worked as a librarian in a university career center. In short, I helped students locate companies and research companies and industries to prepare for interviews. The idea that a librarian could … Continue reading Your Library Is a (Job-Seeker’s) Wonderland →

CORE and the Commons: Digital Scholarship, Collaboration, and Open Access in the Humanities

This week it was reported that Berlin-based ResearchGate, a social networking site designed for scientists to share research, received $52.6m in investment funds from a variety of sources, including BIll Gates (previous investor), Goldman Sachs, and The Wellcome Trust. This news is another development in the a continuing saga and conversation surrounding commercial services (i.e., … Continue reading CORE and the Commons: Digital Scholarship, Collaboration, and Open Access in the Humanities →

Should’ve, Would’ve, Could’ve: The Library Job Hunt

About two years ago, I was already applying for jobs in preparation of graduating from library school. I spent countless hours looking at job posts, writing cover letters, preparing for phone interviews and being anxious about that coveted on-campus interviews. Throughout my residency at American University, I have been able to participate in two (and … Continue reading Should’ve, Would’ve, Could’ve: The Library Job Hunt →

More than a Mausoleum: The Library at the Forefront of Digital Pedagogy

This is adapted from a talk at the Utah Symposium on Digital Humanities, February 11th 2017 in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Over the last decade, we’ve witnessed a shift in the ways in both everyday folk and academics encounter the world. The promise of web 2.0 and the rise of the network has seen the input … Continue reading More than a Mausoleum: The Library at the Forefront of Digital Pedagogy →

Microaggressions, Faculty, and Academic Librarians: a study in intersectionality

I’ve been a follower of LISMicroaggressions on Tumblr for a while now, and even managed to pick up a zine or two in person at various library conferences. Their posts are a much needed reminder that as liberal and well-meaning as we all think/hope/claim/want our libraries to be, the day-to-day experiences of library workers can … Continue reading Microaggressions, Faculty, and Academic Librarians: a study in intersectionality →

Growing a peer digital learning program

I’ve been working with colleagues at my institution over the course of the past year to launch a peer digital learning initiative. The program kicked off this past August with our “Learning in the Digital Age” pre-orientation program. Each year, my institution offers a few four-day pre-orientation programs to incoming undergraduate students. These programs give … Continue reading Growing a peer digital learning program →

Growing a peer digital learning program

I’ve been working with colleagues at my institution over the course of the past year to launch a peer digital learning initiative. The program kicked off this past August with our “Learning in the Digital Age” pre-orientation program. Each year, my institution offers a few four-day pre-orientation programs to incoming undergraduate students. These programs give … Continue reading Growing a peer digital learning program →

Growing a peer digital learning program

I’ve been working with colleagues at my institution over the course of the past year to launch a peer digital learning initiative. The program kicked off this past August with our “Learning in the Digital Age” pre-orientation program. Each year, my institution offers a few four-day pre-orientation programs to incoming undergraduate students. These programs give … Continue reading Growing a peer digital learning program →

A new year, a new approach

Happy 2017 to all ACRLog Readers! Like many other librarians, I have hit the road running. For those of you who do not know, I live in Washington DC and with inauguration last week, I was barely at the office. I also attended the Women’s March and it was a mix of emotions, all at … Continue reading A new year, a new approach →

Hyopthes.is and the dream of universal web annotation

Digital, networked technology has irrevocably altered the way humans process, analyze, and share information, a reality not lost on those in scholarly communications, where traditional modes research and publishing are (albeit slowly) evolving to embrace the potential these advancements offer. Some developments include the rise in open access publishing, an increase in scholarly blogging, sharing … Continue reading Hyopthes.is and the dream of universal web annotation →

Information Literacy and Fake News

ACRLog welcomes a guest post from Candice Benjes-Small, Head of Information Literacy and Faculty Outreach, and Scott Dunn, Associate Professor of Communication, at Radford University. One day in September, a relative emailed me a link and asked, “Should I share this on Facebook?”  I took a look at the linked article, which had an extremely … Continue reading Information Literacy and Fake News →

Library (and Library-relevant) Events and the Inauguration

The U.S. Presidential Inauguration is scheduled for tomorrow, and many organizations have planned programming, displays, and other ways to engage their communities in conversations around issues raised since the election and during the transition. At my college and university we’re still in our winter intersession — our Spring semester doesn’t begin until the end of … Continue reading Library (and Library-relevant) Events and the Inauguration →

A Reference Redo

Our reference desk is in an odd spot. Rather than describe the situation, I created the following hasty floor plan: When students enter the library they don’t see an actual person until they are well past the stairs to the second floor. The circulation desk dwarfs the reference desk, and the reference desk is obscured … Continue reading A Reference Redo →

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